Update: Senate Bill 5659 limiting civil liability for beekeepers

legislative_buildingSenate Bill 5659 limiting civil liability for beekeepers has an addition regarding rights of people with allergy to bees. Here is the senate substitute bill: SSB – 5696

The new language starts at line 18, page 1 and continues to lines 1-3, page 2, and reads:

The rules (to be developed by the apiary advisory committee) shall provide for specific setbacks that must be made upon the written demand of any person having an allergy to bee stings who owns property within one-quarter mile of the location of the hive or hives.

Please contact your representative to not add the additional language. The additional language is unenforceable as one cannot tell where a honey bee originates once it leaves the hive.

Be sure to Contact your Representative

(Parentheses are ours)

Comments

  1. Robert Niles says:

    I support the SB 5696 bill but I request you remove the portion where “setbacks that must be made upon the written demand of any person having an allergy to bee stings who owns property within one-quarter mile of the location of the hive or hives”

    Making setbacks for those within 1/4 mile of a bee hive will not reduce the
    chances of a person getting stung.

    Bees are quite unlikely to sting when foraging for nectar or pollen. They typically only sting to protect their home. Away from their home, stings are most often from stepping on the bee or more rarely, when a bee is poisoned and then lands on a person.

    Bees forage within a 2 to 3 mile radius (can be up to a 5 mile radius). Removing bees within a 1/4 of a mile does nothing.

    There are feral bees – bees that live on their own and are not managed by a bee keeper. These bees may be more likely to sting as they are not bred to be docile.

    There are bumble bees …who are quite nice but can also sting with the same allergic effects …and unlike the honey bee, bumble bees can sting multiple times.

    There are other stinging flying insects, including hornets, wasps and yellow jackets. All of these three can sting repeatedly with the same allergic effects as bees.

    Bees get blamed more most stings – even though most likely a person was stung by a hornet, wasp, or yellow jacket. Yes people get stung by bees but it is quite rare. Dr. David Golden, associate professor in the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Johns Hopkins University’s Medical Institute said there have been about 40 sting deaths per year based on 10-year national statistics. The statistic was confirmed in a similar study done in the 1990s by physician David Graft.

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